5 Healthcare Degree Apprenticeships

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Degree and Higher apprenticeships are becoming available in the world of healthcare! They allow you to study and train on the job whilst earning a wage.

They are offering future health professionals an alternative to traditional pathways of paying tuition fees to study at university and through university placements.

It’s worth noting that most of the apprenticeships we’ve highlighted are relatively new and so are under constant development so if you’re interested in them you should research thoroughly through an apprenticeship provider to get the most up-to-date information.

Here are 5 jobs you can get into through higher apprenticeships and degree apprenticeships or through university study👇👇👇

1. Nursing

Yes, you can become a nurse by either studying Nursing at university OR by training through an apprenticeship!

How long does the training programme last:

If you study through University the degree lasts 3 years. When you graduate most degrees will allow you to register with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) as a qualified Registered Nurse (RN) so you can go straight into work!

Nursing apprenticeships are relatively new and are still being developed. Most are about 4 years in length and would allow you to train on the job with some permitted time for studying towards the degree qualification. Once you finish you too will be able to register as a RN with the NMC.

Interested in becoming a Nurse? Learn more about a career in nursing and the pathways you can take by heading to our How to become a Nurse page!

2. Laboratory Scientist

You can become a scientist by either studying a Science degree at university or by training through an apprenticeship.

There are many different types of roles available as a scientist. Typical job titles include: Analytical Chemist, Research & Development Scientist, Molecular Biologist, Formulation Scientist, Medicinal Chemist, Process Scientist.

How long does the training programme last:

Studying a degree at university will usually take 3 years. Following that it’s likely that you’ll need to join a Scientist Training Programme to gain postgraduate qualifications needed to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Registered Scientist. Employers like the NHS offer competitive programmes for graduate programmes that last around 3 years.

You could choose to do an Apprenticeship as a Laboratory Scientist instead. This will typically take around 5 years to complete and you’ll usually qualify with a degree in the area that’s relevant to your job role. Examples would be Microbiology, Genetics, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chemistry etc. Once you finish you should be able to register with the Science Council as a Registered Scientist!

3. Become a Podiatrist: Podiatry

You can become a podiatrist by either studying at university or by training through an apprenticeship.

How long does the training programme last:

If you study through University the Podiatry degree lasts 3 years. You need to complete a degree programme that is recognised by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in order to be able to work as a Podiatrist.

Podiatry apprenticeships are relatively new and are still being developed. Most are about 4 years in length and would allow you to train on the job with some permitted time for studying towards the Podiatry degree qualification. Once you finish you too will be able to register with the HCPC as a Podiatrist.

4. Clinical Trials Specialist

You can become a Clinical Trials Specialist by either studying at university or by training through an apprenticeship.

How long does the training programme last:

To become a Clinical Trials Specialist you’ll usually need to have studied a Science degree to undergraduate level which takes about 3 years. Following that, employers look for on-the-job experience in order to hire and promote you.

Clinical Trials Specialist apprenticeships last about 5 years in length. During the apprenticeship you’ll complete a degree in your specialism e.g. Physiology, Pharmacology, Biochemistry, Anatomy or Pharmacy. Once you complete you’ll be able to work as a Clinical Trials Specialist!

5. Operating Department Practitioner

There’s routes to becoming an Operating Department Practitioner (ODP) through degree study at university and apprenticeships.

How long does the training programme last:

At university you’ll study an Operating Department Practice degree programme which takes about 3 years. Following that you’ll register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) to practice.

Operating department apprenticeships last around 4 years. During that time you’ll complete a degree in Operating Department Practice. Once completed, you too will register as an ODP with the HCPC.

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